Category Archives: Defensive Secondary

Cornerback Press Coverage Drill from Nick Saban / Alabama

Saban watching a cornerback press coverage drill

Thanks to AL.com for this photo.

I found this little gem on youtube, which is a great resource by the way. It’s short and sweet but worth your time. You’ll seee the Crimson Tide coaches doing a cornerback press drill with their players. It’s a drill that can be used for almost all positions, basically a mirror drill. Notice the footwork and the use of hands throughout the drill. Continue reading

Cover 4 versus the 2 x 2 Spread Offense Pass

Cover 4 versus the 2×2 Spread Offense – Football Coaching Video

Cover 4 is a great way to defend the 2×2 Spread Offense passing game. It allows you to keep a six man box and defend 4 verticals “right out of the box”. For more information on the basics of the cover 4 defense, and it’s slight variation in 2 Read or otherwise known as Cover Blue by TCU fanatics, check out the football coaching video below.

Cover 4 / Quarters Coverage Information Available In This Video

You’ll discover unique information on running the cover 4 defense. This will detail the responsibilities of the cornerback in cover 4 and also the safety’s responsibilities in cover 4. In addition to this, you will learn some of the variations of cover 4, including 2 read, and how leverage is critical for this formation so it can adequately defeat the run and passing game from the spread offense. You’ll learn some of the strengths of cover 4 and the weaknesses of this quarters coverage versus spread 2×2 sets. Overall, this video offers you a basic chalk talk on the main uses of cover 4 in defending the pass against the 2×2 spread offense.

BTW, if you like these videos, check out ChiefPigskin because there are a bunch of great videos!

Defensive Gap Exchange

Gap Exchange between Defensive Linemen, Linebackers, and Safeties

Gap exchange in defensive football occurs between defensive linemen, linebackers and safeties is a critical element for many over fronts and under fronts.

Gap Exchange: Block Down Step Down

The basic gap exchange concept begins at the defensive linemen level, where the defensive linemen responds to a down block by an offensive linemen or tight end. The linemen is likely taught the theory of block down step down, where if the linemen blocks inside he must step inside, disrupt said linemens path, and spill kickout blocks.

The Will Linebacker and the Defensive End in the Under perform a Gap Exchange

The defensive end must keep the tackle off the linebacker by pushing him, and the will must come up quickly to G gap.

The linemen, given the block down step down rule, cannot play his original gap. In essense, he is playing his immediate inside gap. He needs to also focus on getting hands on the blocker who stepped inside while keeping his shoulders square. The defensive linemen simply needs to give a push with one hand, enough to keep the linemen off the playside linebacker or knock his path on his way to a backside linebacker. The defensive linemen, be it end or tackle, must focus, at this point in the play, at keeping his shoulders square. Turning his shoulders this close or on the defense’s side of the line of scrimmage will make it easy for another linemen to log him or, depending on the play, to get around him completely without making the blocker take a better pull path.

Gap Exchange: Open / Closed Window

Inside Gap Exchange between Mike and 5 technique End in Under Front

The End and Mike perform an Inside Gap Exchange, in these cases the defensive end must disrupt the offensive lineman's path

The linebacker needs to read the open or closed window. This should be an easy read as the linebacker flows to his gap. An open window essentially means that the gap he is assigned to his open. A closed window means the gap is blocked and the runningback will not see that hole.

Why is this important to gap exchange principles? As the linebacker reads his hole, if for some reason the defensive linemen is in his gap (he got washed down, or even a called stunt—which means a predetermined gap exchange), then the linebacker needs to work one outside gap, or to the next open gap and press the line of scrimmage while keeping his shoulders square. By pressing the line of scrimmage right away, this causes problems for offensive plays like power where the kickout and wrapping pull blocker occur quickly.

Gap Exchange: Secondary Run Support

Sam Linebacker and Safety Gap Exchange

The Sam Linebacker Follows Block Down Step Down Rules, Safety Reads Him and EMOLOS and Comes Up to D Gap

In many cases, a safety or even a corner, depending on the defense and the formation, may be called upon to gap exchange with a defensive end or EMOLOS. This is common in the Under front, where the Sam linebacker, lined up in a 9 technique outside the offensive tight end, must follow block down step down principles. In this case, the safety must be ready to come up quickly and exchange gap responsibilities with the Sam linebacker.

Gap Exchange – Conclusion

Overall, gap exchange is a good way for a defense to take advantage of the spill technique and use the sideline and team speed to its advantage. If the team has good speed and the front 7 have great hip explosion to help execute some of the technique (wrong arming or spilling), then this can be a great asset for undersized defenses.

P.S., make sure you check out Chiefpigskins offensive line videos!

Backside Safety Play in Cover 4 or Quarters Coverage versus Play Action and the Running Game

Deuce @ Football is Life

Deuce runs an excellent blog and this may not be his only appearance on the top 10 blog posts of the year. He does an excellent job of detailing the 4-2-5 defense in general.

Reviewing How Safety Play in Quarters Coverage versus Running Plays and Play Action Passes

This blog post details how the backside safety in a quarters scheme should play the running game and play action. While he uses the 4-3 defense in his examples, this can be applied to other defenses using a quarters scheme. While cover 4 and its variants offer terrific run support, the big play weaknesses scare many coaches away from it. Deuce does a terrific job detailing the intricacies of backside safety play in cover 4, offering some great insight on this important aspect of cover 4/quarters based schemes.

Click here to read Deuce’s post on backside safety play in quarters coverage schemes. You can follow Deuce’s twitter by clicking here!

P.S.

Chiefpigskin’s still rolling out some great free videos.
Looking for plays that beat the backside safety? Check out this play action pass concept from the Vikings.