Category Archives: Offensive Football

Adding Unbalanced Formations to Your Offense

One of least utilized tools in the Offensive Coordinator’s toolbox has to be the use of the unbalanced offensive formations.

What I mean by unbalanced formations is either covering up an eligible receiver by other receivers to create an overload, or switching an offensive lineman and a receiver such as a TE to create dilemma between defending the passing or running strength.

Many option offenses often use different types of unbalanced formations, but not many Zone or Gap teams utilize these looks. The purpose of this article will be to present unbalanced formation concepts to these types of offenses to use against defenses when a schematic advantage might be needed versus a superior opponent. Continue reading

NIU’s Empty Formation QB Power / Counter Combination Play

Northern Illinois has a pretty nifty offense. It seems to be all the rage these days. However, when you watch the film, the vast majority of the offense relies heavily on the old, reliable power blocking scheme. In this case, since they run QB power from an empty formation, they’re kicking out the end with the guard in this specific usage of the power scheme.

You may consider this a trap play, but it’s using the power blocking concept (specifically the “counter” play scheme, with the QB’s read acting as the “wrapper” typically filled by the fullback or pulling tackle).

They run a lot of QB power, and this article will focus on their combination QB power play with the jailbreak screen. Continue reading

Basics of the Shotgun Power Read Concept

We see a lot of teams running Power Read concept. Some people call this Power Option, or Inverted Veer, or something else. Whatever you call the play, it’s the old school Power or “Power-O” concept.

What exactly is the Power Read concept? The offensive line is basically blocking Power, except the offense is reading the defensive end instead of kicking him out. If you do this from a 2 back set, the fullback or H-back player can now leak into the alley.

Power Read vs 4-2

Notice The Double Rather than a Combo Block on the 3 Technique

Let’s take a deeper dive into the play, including differences with the traditional power scheme and some clips from Baylor in 2013.
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Here’s 3 Quick Passing Game Keys to Ensure Offensive Success

Find out how coaches are easily transforming their offense with no-new concepts

There’s been a lot of emphasis on the middle to deep passing game lately that the quick passing game is losing it’s luster.

A quality quick passing game can transform your offense, eliminate tendencies, and improve 1st down efficiency.

Quick Passing Game Key #1: BE QUICK

Emphasis on the QUICK. The quick passing game depends on swift ball release. Continue reading

3 Reasons to Run the Midline Option

The midline option is often forgotten in today’s days of the spread offense. The Zone read, the triple option, etc… all still thrive, even when the team is in the gun.

But what happened to the Midline option? There are a few exceptions, for instance, Oregon has been known to run it – must notably getting it blown up by Auburn’s defensive tackles in their national championship game a few years ago.

But unless you’re going up against first round picks with freakish like athleticism every play, midline option is still a good concept.

QB Midline Option Pull

Here’s 3 reasons you should run the midline option, no matter what offense you run.
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How to use Inside Zone to Beat the All Out Blitz Look

Inside Zone can dismantle the all out blitz. Many coaches check to a toss play or a screen versus the heavy blitz look – however this can become overly predictable.

This article will discuss the how and why you should use the inside zone play versus the heavy blitz play, at least in some situations.
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Flexible Passing Concepts for Multiple Teams

With more and more offenses trying to be multiple in this era, there is a unique need to minimize new learning – especially in regards to the passing game and passing concepts.

I’m of the belief that excessive new learning truly tanks your teams ability to excel. I’ve touched on this topic several times already, but not so much in the passing game.

Let’s be honest, in any of your passing concepts, if a receiver screws up a route, it can be devastating to your offensive attack. For high school teams that try to be multiple with formations, this can lead to problems.

Below you’ll find a fairly solid system for passing concepts that ensures you get receivers in the correct routes, generally. While passing concept systems are not perfect, this one included, they do minimize learning, without teaching a numbered route system. And I feel this system is one of the best at minimizing learning. Continue reading