The Logic and Science of Offensive Play Calling and Tempo

  

Guest Football Coaching Blog Post

This is a guest blog post on offensive tempo and play calling by the Coach Kurt Earl, offensive coordinator at Lincoln Christian School and publisher of Compete4Christ, a football blog. You can follow him on his Twitter Handle, KurtEarl14.

As a man of deep faith in my Lord and Savior Jesus Christ I try to live my life intentionally. I do my best as a husband, teacher and coach to live with a purpose and to make intentional decisions. As the Offensive Coordinator at Lincoln Christian School I have designed our offensive strategies and schemes with the same intentionality.

Lincoln Christian is a small school (averaging about 40 students per grade) and we rarely have more than 35 boys out for football. Of those 35 or fewer boys roughly 6-10 are linemen. Thus, nearly every starter starts both ways and we are always making linemen out of young men who are probably better suited for fullback. Furthermore, our skill players tend to be very skillful and quick, but often lack the sheer strength needed to pound out yardage between the tackles.

A few years ago we realized we were wasting our time trying to develop our young men into your prototypical football players. Like Brad Pitt’s character Billy Beane in the movie Moneyball we embraced the fact that we simply could not compete with the New York Yankees of our district by trying to match them man for man. Also, like Beane we did not and would not have players that fit into the classic molds and systems. As a result we have adopted an offensive strategy intentionally structured around two specific slogans.

Slogan #1: We got science

Slogan #2: We got answers

We Got Science – Biology Behind the Tempo

“We got science” means that we operate in a no huddle, full throttle offense because it does not allow the defense to recover between plays. The lack of recovery between plays forces our opponent to operate in what is commonly referred to as the Lactic Acid Energy System. Defending us is more like running an 800 meter sprint and less like throwing the shot or running a 40 yard dash. Our strength and conditioning program, practice tempo and overall mentality prepare our players to compete in their Lactic Acid Energy System.

As a result, we have the advantage every time we step onto the field. Our intentional effort to operate in a different energy system than our opponent gives us a leg up from the opening kickoff. The vast majority of teams, even those who run a no huddle offense, do not move from play to play fast enough to force their opponent out of the ATP-PT Energy System. The ATP-PT Energy System provides the necessary energy for intense bouts of exercise that last 6-8 seconds. Sounds like a football play, right? The key to “we got science” is to transition quickly from play to play.

We Got Answers – Logic Behind the Play Calling

We do several things to help us transition from one play to another quickly, but the biggest key to our quick transition is “We got answers.” Slogan number two, “we got answers,” means that our offense is a collection of series not a collection of plays. Each series features a base concept. The base concept is then complimented by a number of plays designed to provide answers to the defense’s potential adjustments to the base concept. Using the feedback the other coaches are giving me in the headsets I call THE play that is THE response to THE adjustment the defense is making. This means that I can call plays in a split second. As the play caller I roam the sidelines with a chart that outlines our series and plays. The chart is structured so that I can easily find THE play we need based on the information I have.

“We got answers” makes play calling a systematic, intentional response to the defenses’ attempts to stop our base concepts. We do not have a collection of plays thrown together in a play book. We have 5-8 base concepts that are complimented by dozens of “answers” to potential defensive adjustments. As players grow and mature in the system they begin to understand it and actually anticipate play calls. When we are hitting on all cylinders, I watch everyone nod their heads in agreement with the call as they line up for the next play.
I recognize that everyone is calling plays based on the information the defense is giving them. At the same time, however, I think our offense is unique in that every call I make is a counter punch. We don’t really have a “bread and butter” play. We take what the defense is giving us. We wait for the defense to show their hand and then respond.

Simple, Exciting, Fun

When everyone in the game is on the same page like this it creates an environment in which operating at a fast tempo is simple, exciting and fun. We take great pride in eight play drives that cover less than two minutes of game clock and make defensive linemen feel like they just ran an 800 meter while stopping to push a car every 20 seconds.

I would like to conclude by recognizing that there is more than way to score points in football. One of the greatest things about football is the diversity it allows. No two offenses are exactly alike. Thus, my goal here is not to convince you to run a no huddle, spread offense. Rather, my goal is to encourage you to embrace your circumstances, your players and your opportunities and to adapt an offensive strategy that is intentionally designed to fit your needs. Don’t identify excuses, create answers.

Finally, if you’d like to know more about how competing in athletics can be a tremendous aspect of a person’s walk with Christ take a minute to check out my blog Compete4Christ at www.compete4christ.blogspot.com

Side note, make sure you checkout ChiefPigskin.com for interesting play calling information.


Related Posts

  

3 thoughts on “The Logic and Science of Offensive Play Calling and Tempo

  1. Kurt Earl

    Coach Hoover,
    No problem. First, you should know that we operate almost exclusively from a single formation. We put trips to the field and single wide out on the bottom of the numbers on the week side. We stack the #2 and #3 receivers. We run a simple bubble screen to the stacked receiver, inside zone read, fly stretch (the stack receiver is put in motion before the snap and takes the ball on an outside zone play), speed option and a spot screen to the widest receiver on the trips side. The important thing to remember is that we run about 45 plays and all of them are direct “answers” to the adjustments the defense is making.

  2. Pingback: Offensive Game Plan: You Be You | Strong Football by CoachCP

Comments are closed.